Color values

Q&A with Sharon Peters

Q:

My husband has long (for decades) desired a Porsche 911. (I love the idea, too). We finally have the means to do it. But he is kind of taken with an odd color called lime gold metallic, which worries me because I think that will wreck resale value. What do you think?

A:

I think a guy who’s waited decades for his dream car should get what he wants! Seriously. (Provided it’s only resale concerns and not a personal hatred for the color that’s got you worried, as I’m guessing it’ll be your car, too, and you don’t want to be driving something you find embarrassing).

You’ll no doubt own that car for many years, and if you give it loving care, there will be a buyer. Conventional wisdom favors buying a white, black or silver car so as to be able to attract the largest possible number of potential buyers when the time comes. But you don’t need 50 people to make offers, you need only one, and high-end car buyers are a somewhat different crowd, who often appreciate “limited edition” colors.

Moreover, for what it’s worth, I think that color is great on that particular vehicle (though it would look ridiculous on many others). I happened to see one recently and chased it down the street (breaking no speed laws, of course) to get a better look.

Lime gold metallic is designated a “special” color, which means you’ll spend more for it (about $3,000, actually), but it is distinctive and classy (nothing like what its unfortunate name choice would suggest, and much more tasteful than it appears in photographs).

However, as Consumer Reports warned last year, any painting touch-ups necessary down the road, for dings in the door for example, will cost more than the normal such body work when you choose anything other than the most basic of colors (from any carmaker).

Q:

I keep reading about “biodiesel fuels” but I have to admit I don’t know what the term means. Can you explain?

A:

That’s the term applied to fuels made from plant or animal oils or from recycled restaurant grease.

According to fueleconomy.gov, it is a cleanerburning alternative to petroleum diesel.

© CTW Features

What’s your question? Sharon Peters would like to hear about what’s on your mind when it comes to caring for, driving and repairing your vehicle. Email Sharon@ctwfeatures.com.