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 STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER ERIC SUCAR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER ERIC SUCAR The Force was strong at the Plumsted Library in Plumsted Township, Ocean County, on Dec. 16 when a celebration of all things “Star Wars” was held in conjunction with the opening of “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.”

Carriers should ensure deliveries

I have been hearing a lot in the news lately about missing packages from people’s front porches. The carriers who deliver the packages can solve this problem.

For example, as it is now, the delivery person sets the package on the front porch and rings the doorbell. The carrier does not wait to see if the customer is at home. Whatever happened to making sure the customer gets the shipment? There have been times when I was doing something upstairs and by the time I get downstairs the delivery person is in the truck already.

In some cases, the customer may not be at home. Is it too much effort to go next door and leave the package with someone?

In conclusion, there is a solution to this problem and if the carriers (UPS, FedEx, DHL etc.) would finish doing the job by making sure the shipment actually gets into the customer’s hands then there would not be any problems.

Whatever happened to customer service?

Michael Hart
North Brunswick

Evelyn Marie Wenzel

Evelyn Marie Wenzel, 88, passed away peacefully on Dec. 4 at the Seasons Hospice and Palliative Care Center, Naperville, Illinois.

Evelyn was born on June 3, 1927, a daughter to the late Michael and Maria (Zachary) Maklary and a sister to the late Louis Maklary from South River.

She graduated from South River High School in 1945. She fell in love and married Albert William Wenzel on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 25, 1948. They lived in Milltown and had three children: Corey William, Kurt Allyn and Kristine Maryann. In 1974, they moved to Naperville, Illinois.

Evelyn’s beloved husband, Albert, died suddenly while on vacation in August 1975. Evelyn persevered to live a happy, long life, though she never remarried. She had an adventurous spirit and made it to places like California, Texas, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Italy, France and Ireland.

Evelyn was a devoted Catholic, praying for others more than praying for herself. She attended Our Lady of Lourdes Church, Milltown, and St. Raphael’s Church, Naperville, Illinois, among other places of worship. She was a kind, generous person, often helping others. She had an endearing laugh and great smile that would always make you feel good.

Evelyn leaves her loving memories to be cherished by her three grown children, 10 grandchildren and one great-grand child on the way in April 2016. She loved them all.

Per Evelyn’s wishes, no viewing or services will be held. She will be cremated per her instructions and be buried in a plot at Saints Peter and Paul Cemetery, Naperville, Illinois, next to her beloved husband, Albert, who has waited 40 years for her arrival. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Catholic Charities. Cards may be sent to Kurt Wenzel, 4246 Central Park Lane, Aurora, Illinois, 60504.

Students’ efforts for outgoing Monroe mayor take the cake

 Nicholas Ryan, left to right, Julianna Marsh and Rina Thaker presented Mayor Richard Pucci with a cake in 2007 as part of a third-grade project.  PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOSEPH HARVIE Nicholas Ryan, left to right, Julianna Marsh and Rina Thaker presented Mayor Richard Pucci with a cake in 2007 as part of a third-grade project. PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOSEPH HARVIE MONROE — One of the final official visits to Mayor Richard Pucci’s office included a delicious treat from three Monroe Township High School (MTHS) seniors.

Students Rina Thaker, Nicholas Ryan and Julianna Marsh brought Pucci a cinnamon cake they made using a recipe they created when they were in the third grade at Mill Lake School on Monmouth Road in 2007.

“We had to come up with the recipe from scratch in third grade and we came in and shared the cake with the mayor,” Rina said. “So, we thought it would be nice to make the cake again and share it with the mayor before he leaves office.”

The students were joined by their former third grade teacher, Bethanne Augsbach.

“I still remember the original cake they made eight years ago,” Augsbach said. “It took a lot of attempts to get to the final recipe. Some of the first tries were like hockey pucks and others just didn’t work at all. But that was the point of the project: to get the children to think critically.”

 Monroe Township High School students Rina Thaker, far left, Nicholas Ryan, second from left and Julianna Marsh, second from right, along with their third grade teacher Bethanne Augsbach, far right, present outgoing Mayor Richard Pucci, center, with a cake based off of one they made in 2007 as part of a third-grade project. Monroe Township High School students Rina Thaker, far left, Nicholas Ryan, second from left and Julianna Marsh, second from right, along with their third grade teacher Bethanne Augsbach, far right, present outgoing Mayor Richard Pucci, center, with a cake based off of one they made in 2007 as part of a third-grade project. Pucci was happy to spend time with the students during his final weeks in office.

“I can’t think of a more enjoyable visit as I close my tenure as mayor,” Pucci said. “We have some incredible students here in Monroe and it has been my pleasure to watch so many of them grow into fine adults.”

Jeanette Collier Appleby

Jeanette Collier Appleby died Dec. 18 at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick. She was 94.

Born in Roebling to the late William and Ida Jones Collier, she resided in South River and the Rossmoor community in Monroe Township before returning to South River.

She was a member of the Red Hat Society, the South River Seniors, the South River Lions Club Ladies Auxiliary and the Limo Ladies of Rossmoor. She enjoyed singing, traveling, reading and spending time with her family and friends.

She was a long time member of Conklin United Methodist Church, South River.

She was predeceased by her husband, C. Robert Appleby, in 1999; and by her son, C. Robert Appleby Jr., in 1991.

Surviving are her four sons, William and his wife, Linda, of South Seaside Park; David and his wife, Linda, of Sayreville; Brian and his wife, Noreen, of South River; and Kevin and his wife, Kathy, of South River; her daughter, Jeanette, and her husband, Stephen Biehl, of South River; 12 grandchildren; and eight great grandchildren.

Rezem Funeral Home, 457 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick, made the funeral arrangements. A funeral service was held at Conklin Methodist Church, 82 Main St., South River. Interment followed at Old Tennent Cemetery, Manalapan.

Visit www.rezemfh.com.

Monroe, Woodbridge receive sustainable grant funding

The Monroe Township and Woodbridge school districts were among seven public school districts and seven municipalities selected to receive Sustainable Jersey grants funded by the Gardinier Environmental Fund.

Monroe received $10,000 for “Energizing our Future.” Six online learning modules on energy sources and energy use will be created. The modules will be shared at each of the district’s eight schools by green team members. The green team will also present hands-on activities related to sustainable energy to students at each grade level. The project will culminate with a Sustainable Energy Tell a Friend Contest, which will be open to all classes in grades K-8.

Woodbridge received $30,000 for a microgrid study. Township resiliency will be increased by connecting several facilities throughout the town to establish a microgrid, which is made of small energy systems comprising distributed generation and electrical infrastructure that runs parallel to traditional grids. The grant will be used to plan and implement preliminary steps to build a microgrid, including a broad range of data collection aimed at identifying categories of facilities that may require power during a blackout.

“Investments in local energy projects will help us make progress toward the goal of a more sustainable and resilient New Jersey,” said Randall Solomon, who co-directs Sustainable Jersey with Donna Drewes. “Congratulations to the forwardthinking school districts and municipalities that developed these projects.”

“The Gardinier Environmental Fund is committed to conserving the earth’s energy resources and enhancing renewable energy measures,” said Gene Wentzel, president of the Gardinier Environmental Fund. “We are proud to stand alongside Sustainable Jersey, and to continue to fund worthy projects that support our mutual goals in New Jersey.”

To date, the Gardinier Environmental Fund has provided $365,000 to the Sustainable Jersey Small Grants program.

Monroe to name historic school after former councilman Miller

By KATHY CHANG
Staff Writer

MONROE — The 19th-century historic Prospect Plains Road Schoolhouse will be named after former long-time Councilman Henry L. “Hank” Miller.

The Township Council voted in favor of a resolution of the dedication at a council meeting on Dec. 9.

Miller served as a councilman for 24 years before retiring in 2013. During his tenure, he was instrumental in establishing the Monroe Township Historical Preservation Commission.

The schoolhouse along Federal Road is the only remaining one-room schoolhouse of 16 that served as the local educational facilities until 1936.

The first phase to restore the schoolhouse and barn was underway in August on the site of the Charles Dey farm.

The Dey Farmhouse, which already stands on the site, serves as a museum, packed with historic artifacts ranging from Native American arrowheads to World War II-era news clippings and 1940s television sets, all donated by local residents.

The 16 one-room school buildings were all built between 1838 and 1850, officials said. Those schools were shut down when the Barclay Brook School and the Applegarth School were built in 1936 as part of the New Deal’s Works Progress Administration.

The school under reconstruction on Federal Road then became the old municipal building on Prospect Plains Road until the current town hall opened in 1982.

It was then periodically used by the local recreation department, as well as utilized as a food pantry until it was taken down and preserved.

The project to restore the schoolhouse and the original Dey Barn is taking place on a 40-acre tract donated by Renaissance Properties, developer of nearby Southfield Estates, in 2001. Monroe received a $1 million grant from Middlesex County to undertake the historic preservation.

Mayor Richard Pucci said he spoke with Council President Gerald Tamburro about doing something special at his last official council meeting as mayor.

He said Miller’s service to the township, which also included a position as chairman of the Planning Board and an educator, made Miller special to not only his administration, but to the entire community.

“We wanted to have a remembrance picture plaque name in honor of your great achievements,” Pucci said to Miller at the meeting.

Miller said it is remarkable how Monroe Township has grown and said the township is fortunate for the many “good people” who live here.

“Ladies and gentleman, it has been an honor to serve … thank you so much for what you have given to me,” he said.

Tamburro said the official ceremony for naming the building would take place in spring 2016.

Carl O.E. Bosenberg

Carl O.E. Bosenberg, 96, died Dec. 6 at the Francis E. Parker Memorial Home, Piscataway.

Born Sept. 29, 1919, in Jugenheim, Germany, he came to the United States with his parents, Henry F. and Martha Bosenberg, settling in North Brunswick in 1924.

He began working as a young boy with his father in the family business, Henry F. Bosenberg and Son Inc. in North Brunswick. In 1931, they developed the first ever-blooming climbing rose, the New Dawn, for which they were awarded United States plant patent number one.

Carl was a 1938 graduate of New Brunswick High School and a 1942 graduate of Rutgers University’s College of Agriculture. While at Rutgers, he wrestled, played on the 150-pound football team and was in the ROTC.

After graduation, he went to the Coast Guard Academy, New London, Connecticut. He served in the South Pacific during World War II aboard LST 24. He returned stateside in 1944 and served as the commanding officer of the station in Pascagoula, Mississippi. While there, he met Mildred N. Bundy, and they were married in 1945.

He remained in the Coast Guard for many years, retiring with the rank of Commander. After the war, Carl and Mildred returned to North Brunswick where they raised their family and lived for the remainder of their lives. Upon his return to North Brunswick, he continued to work with this father, taking over the business in 1962. They did residential landscaping and tree work, as well as commercial work for Rutgers University, Johnson & Johnson, and several area municipalities for many years.

During the 1950s, he served on the North Brunswick Board of Education.

His wife, Mildred, died in 2002.

Surviving are a son, Robert Bosenberg, and his wife, Kim, of Lacombe, Louisiana; a daughter, Martha Decker, and her husband, Dennis, of North Brunswick; four grandchildren, Matthew Decker, Scott Decker, Kate Louise (Decker) Corriero and Brett Bosenberg; and three great-grandchildren, Luke Decker, Lucy Decker and Finn Corriero.

A memorial service was held at Kirkpatrick Chapel, New Brunswick, and burial took place at Van Liew Cemetery, New Brunswick.

Funeral arrangements were made by Quackenboss Funeral Home, 156 Livingston, Ave., New Brunswick.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Coast Guard Mutual Assistance, 1005 N. Glebe Road, Suite 220, Arlington, Virginia, 22201, (online at www.cgmahq.org), or to Fisher House Foundation, which provides homes for military personnel and veterans while they receive medical care, at P.O. Box 97229, Washington, DC, 20077-7804, (online at www.fisherhouse.org.)

Local college student organizes global event in one month

By JENNIFER AMATO
Staff Writer

NORTH BRUNSWICK — A young man from North Brunswick organized a competition that has a global impact.

Umair Masood, a sophomore at Rutgers University, served as campus director for the seventh annual Hult Prize competition at Rutgers on Dec. 5, when 10 teams competed to solve former President Bill Clinton’s challenge for 2015: How to end poverty in urban spaces and encourage students to build sustainable, scalable and fast-growing social enterprises that double the income of 10 million people resided in crowded urban spaces by better connecting people, goods, services and capital.

“This creates a community platform for social entrepreneurs on campus who are trying to get their name out there,” Masood said.

“The one thing I learned as director is that there is a huge entrepreneurial community at Rutgers and there is a new wave of social entrepreneurship [that is] creating an idea or a project that is profitable while solving the world’s problems at the same time, which is very powerful.”

Masood was able to pull the event together in just a month’s time, having to find teams and judges, obtain sponsors and partners and secure prize money.

His experience was rooted in a five-year internship at the American Muslim Consumer Consortium, founded by his parents, Faisal Masood and Sabiha Ansari, to understand and address the needs of American Muslim consumers and to empower companies developing products for the market.

“I’ve seen them run an event, build a network and brand themselves,” he said.

The winning team members from Rutgers University were Daniel Reji of Holmdel, David Shah of Edison, Chisa Egbelu of Louisiana and Myles Jackson of Pennsylvania. They were awarded $500 and will represent Rutgers at Regionals in Boston in March.

Following the regional finals, one winning team from each host city will move into a summer business accelerator program, where participants will receive mentorship, advisory and strategic planning as they create prototypes and set-up to launch their new social business.

The final round of competition will be hosted at the Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting in September, when one team will be selected as the Hult Prize recipient. Clinton himself will award the $1,000,000 prize to the winning team.

“The Hult Prize is a wonderful example of the creative cooperation needed to build a world with shared opportunity, shared responsibility, and shared prosperity, and each year I look forward to seeing the many outstanding ideas the competition produces,” Clinton said in a statement.

For more information on the event, visit hultprizeat.com/rutgers.

Contact Jennifer Amato at jamato@gmnews.com.