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JERRY WOLKOWITZ  Brick quarterback Kyle Watson looks to execute an option pass while avoiding Southern Regional defensive lineman Pat Schnell during the Green Dragons’      15-13 win in Brick on Saturday. For story, see page sports.JERRY WOLKOWITZ Brick quarterback Kyle Watson looks to execute an option pass while avoiding Southern Regional defensive lineman Pat Schnell during the Green Dragons’ 15-13 win in Brick on Saturday. For story, see page sports.

Police: New drought rules, same enforcement policy

Police would rather
people comply voluntarily, but will write tickets

By Karl Vilacoba
Staff Writer

Police would rather
people comply voluntarily, but will write tickets
By Karl Vilacoba
Staff Writer

Police in Brick maintain that the latest set of water-use restrictions will not complicate matters from an enforcement standpoint.

Last week, Brick Mayor Joseph Scarpelli met with officials from the Brick Township Municipal Utilities Authority (BTMUA) to discuss New Jersey’s recently relaxed restrictions. Because municipalities have the right to supersede state guidelines to make them stricter if warranted, the township was able to adopt most of the state’s, except one. The window of time to water lawns in the township on odd/even days is now 20 minutes from the hours of 7 p.m. to midnight.

"Is it going to be hard? We’re not going to be sitting by people’s lawns timing them for their 20 minutes," said Brick Township police Lt. Doug Kenny. "It may be easier because what we’re looking for is compliance and not enforcement."

Kenny said that during the summer, authorities made a concerted effort to enforce water-use violations, which then prohibited any lawn watering whatsoever. Special officers, code enforcement officers, BTMUA personnel and regular police all patrolled the township.

Kenny estimated that more than 1,000 warnings and 25 summonses were issued at that time.

"Our policy has been, we’ll warn you once, and if we have to come back, we’ll issue a summons," Kenny said. "Our policy hasn’t changed."

Despite the long-standing media coverage and efforts by government agencies to promote awareness of the state’s drought conditions, Scarpelli said last week that there are still isolated cases of people saying that they were unaware. However, Kenny said those claims have died down lately, just like the volume of phone calls from concerned citizens reporting violations.

"I think everybody has pretty much heard about the drought by now," Kenny said. "I’ve really only heard of one phone call this week (reporting a violation)."

A full set of the latest restrictions can be found on www.njdrought.org. On the Web site, a statement from N.J. Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bradley Campbell warns that the situation is still considered an emergency, and residents should still take measures to conserve water.

"We’re just praying for rain," Kenny said.


Charities get $55K in grants

By karl vilacoba
Staff Writer

By karl vilacoba
Staff Writer

BRICK — Several charitable organizations were recently given a boost through the disbursement of $54,600 in federal grant funds.

Six groups received donations at the Oct. 22 Township Council meeting from the Community Development Block Grant program (CDBG). The overall program is funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

The organizations that received CDBG funds were: Word of Life, manager of a food bank for area residents; Meals on Wheels, a provider of meals to homebound area seniors; Providence House, a provider of services to victims of domestic abuse; VetGroup of Ocean County, which assists veterans with job training and counseling services; Interfaith Hospitality Network of Ocean County, which provides assistance to the homeless; and Contact of Ocean County, which provides telephone counseling and referral assistance.

Presenting ceremonial checks to representatives of each group, Mayor Joseph Scarpelli praised the CDBG for 13 years of improving the quality of life in the area.

"Every mayor should be having a night like this," Scarpelli said. "Could you imagine that fun?"

Individually, Word of Life, Meals on Wheels and Providence House received $15,000 each. VetGroup received $5,000, Interfaith Hospitality Network, $4,500, and Contact, $3,100, respectively.

"These charitable groups provide many important services to the people of our community," Scarpelli said. "I will continue to work to see that funds received by Brick Township through the CDBG program are used to make Brick Township a better place."

Along the lines of philanthropic work, the council passed a resolution naming the mayor, U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R-4th District) and Anthony Cirillo as the Parents of Autistic Children (POAC) People of the Year.

According to the resolution, Scarpelli has been a "staunch supporter" of the group who has raised funds and awareness for their cause. Smith was recognized as being instrumental in obtaining federal funding for a study of autism that was conducted in the community several years ago. Cirillo, whose nephew is affected by autism, was also praised for raising funds and awareness for the POAC’s cause.


Two 1-acre tracts will be preserved as open space

House on one of
the Hulse properties
dates back to 1890s

By karl vilacoba
Staff Writer

House on one of
the Hulse properties
dates back to 1890s
By karl vilacoba
Staff Writer

BRICK — Township officials have moved ahead with a plan to purchase two tracts known as the Hulse properties for open space preservation near the intersection of Herbertsville Road and Maple Avenue.

One of the two 1-acre tracts is said to have some historical value.

A home standing on one of the properties dates back to the 1890s, Brick Township Historian Gene Donatiello said. The home was originally a farmhouse located on Maple Avenue but was moved to its current spot between 1940 and 1950, he said.

The properties, located at 471 and 481 Herbertsville Road, were registered to Matilda and David Hulse, and Agnes Hulse, according to Ocean County Clerk’s Office records.

Officials said the century-old home will be used by township staff and community groups. The properties will become part of an unofficial historic zone along Herbertsville Road that includes the Havens Homestead, the Herbertsville Schoolhouse, the Herbertsville Methodist Church and several other older homes.

During the Oct. 20 Township Council meeting, a resolution was passed authorizing the purchase of the properties for the total sum of $527,500.

Aside from the historical value of the properties, Councilman Stephen Acropolis said during the meeting that the purchase was a win for Brick in terms of blocking further development.

Those sentiments were echoed last week by Mayor Joseph Scarpelli, who said the purchase was another step forward in protecting the environment. The Manasquan River runs a short distance away from the properties.

The Hulse properties are also adjacent to the Sawmill tract, purchased by Brick as open space in 1997. Today, the area is used for its more than two miles of bicycle trails.